Battles and Broken Borders — Samantha

Towards the end of winter, field work became a bit too predictable: I find my fox, we wander around, and end up more or less where we started. But the onset of the breeding season is causing more than romance to blossom, with batties popping up where they’ve never been seen, and unrest manifesting in previously calm neighbourhoods. The docile creatures that they are, I expected most of these changes to be genteel. In one case, however, a foraging altercation took an interesting turn.

One of the areas I visit is home to an odd pair of foxes, Aristotle (Ari for short) and Scruffy. Scruffy is a particularly ill-kempt vixen. While I have no doubt that at least some of Scruffy’s problems are rooted in her thriving community of on-board parasites, I’ve slowly come to realise that part of her problem is Ari. There is just no way to sugarcoat this: Ari is an abusive husband. I’ve seen him chase Scruffy, nip her, snarl at her and just generally mistreat her for no apparent reason. He’s not the loving husband that batties are supposed to be. And it turns out that Ari just acts like a mean drunk in any context. One evening, Ari turned up unexpectedly while I was following Bruce. At first, Bruce sauntered off, pretty much ignoring this snarling new arrival. A couple of minutes later, Ari tried to muscle in on some ants Bruce was gulping down and suddenly all hell broke loose. Now I’ve seen battie “aggression” before: foxes approach each other, growl a bit, or make half-hearted attempts to give chase. But this night, the boys meant business. Bruce and Ari launched into one another, the perfect snarling, biting cartoonish dust-ball. I couldn’t tell one battie apart from the other. And then, in a few seconds, it was over. Ari was sent packing down the road, presumably back to take his frustrations out on his long-suffering wife. Bruce meanwhile shook himself off, and conscientiously urinated on anything in his neighbourhood that didn’t run away.

This is the first serious fight I’ve seen in two months and it will certainly be interesting when we find out what hormonal changes are driving this behaviour. I can’t help wondering if the vagabond syndrome and serious aggression will become commonplace. Love (and War) are in the air.

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