Puppy Love — Keafon

The breeding season has finally yielded excitement in the field as one of our very own, Bertha, had a litter of adorable pups! Perhaps even more surprising is the fact that no one saw it coming, least of all, not from Bertha, who is notoriously shy and showed no signs of pregnancy. The same cannot be said of Garbuncle, whose thick fur and mood swings got us fooled into thinking she was pregnant, but these “signs” turned out to be false alarms.

The pups, who have been sheltering in dens, are now beginning to venture into the wild in search of food. The recent drought presents a major food challenge for both mom and pups, who can no longer be sustained by milk alone. As they wander far and wide in search for food, locating individuals to do focal behavioural studies on is getting a bit tricky as their territorial boundaries have expanded. It is no longer unusual to spot new and unfamiliar neighbours that roam right into our nightly sessions. Some of our “own” foxes, like Ilor, are even skipping reserve boundaries altogether and venturing deep into nearby farms.

During a late night search for Bertha, I stumbled upon what at first looked like a wild cat, bouncing about in the bushes like a ping pong ball. It was only when it stopped and peered intently at me with small black eyes that I realized it was a pup! I had not seen any of them until now and needless to say, it was love at first sight. Soon enough, I found myself surrounded by three pups and their mom, all eager for some raisins.

Bat-eared fox pup

Ears that only a mother could love?

I could see a new (thesis) chapter unfolding right before my eyes, as several questions came to mind: how are they coping in this climate of drought? Given that lactation is likely to increase Bertha’s nutritional requirements, how does her feeding frequency and meal constituent compare to her pre-maternal state? Feeding demands made by pups will no doubt influence her feeding patterns. I now have the opportunity to investigate these and more; such as the quality of maternal care, by noting down factors (grooming, nursing/feeding, ‘pup-protection’ etc) that will help me answer these questions. Sadly, all my proverbial eggs are in one basket for now — Bertha’s. I will be keeping a close tab on Bertha and her brood for the next couple of months as I get more acquainted with the pups.

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About Keafon

I’m privileged to be part of this growing group of enthusiastic and hardworking young scientists making their mark in the interesting world of carnivore research. My previous research was predominantly on invertebrates; firstly with spiders on sub-Antarctic Marion Island for my Honours degree and then with invasive Argentine ants for my MSc at Stellenbosch University. Batties are therefore my very first encounter with the mammal world and my project is aimed at exploring both physiological and ecological factors influencing stress levels in female batties. While I look forward to sharing my experiences with you, I'm also thrilled to have been selected from a nationwide competition to blog about my PhD journey on SAYAS (http://sayasblog.com/).