End of an era…

Cylon's pupsWith the loss of many of our habituated individuals, we had long hoped that this year’s pups would help replenish our population so that the study could continue. Unfortunately, we lost seven individuals in rapid succession. Baine, one of our best individuals for conducting experiments on, disappeared with his two pups. Cylon and his three pups (already well habituated and starting to forage independently) disappeared as well. We lost all signal from their collars and searched endlessly on this reserve and the surrounding farms. We were left with one habituated fox and very little hope of finding new individuals soon. This disheartening news led to the decision that we were going to have to shut down fieldwork at this location.

 

As responsible field biologists, We (Steph and Matt) had to take off Barbie’s radio collar before we left. How would we be able to do this? Luring foxes into the large cage-traps had never really worked. When we put the collars on, we had the help of vets and large nets… but Barbie has always been quite skittish, so we had to come up with another idea. Earlier on, when Cylon had a paw caught in his collar, we successfully used a noose to catch him so we decided to give it a THE noosetry on Barbie. Because of her reluctance to get close to us, we prepared ourselves for a number of unsuccessful attempts at capturing her. We went out there, armed with a noose, a net, a little patience, and a lot of anticipation. We crept close to her in the red dune area south of the riverbed, lured her in with an abundance of raisins, humming softly to her. Slowly, but surely, she inched her way towards us. The tricky part, you see, isn’t getting her to come close to us, but to get her head into the noose without touching those big, characteristic ears. If you do, they jolt away from you and you have to retry hoping they don’t run too far away from you. This is exactly what happened…twice, but with perseverance and a bit of luck, she put her head through the noose while reaching for a raisin. We tightened the rope and rushed in to pin her down. This is for her and our own safety as she could easily bite us or get entangled in the rope. We quickly undid the screw that was holding the collar on tightly and removed the leather straps. The rope Baine's pupswas released and she ran free. She turned around about ten meters and looked at us indignantly. We didn’t mind though, she was free to go live her life and hopefully raise some pups in the future.

With any luck, by the time we start fieldwork again, she will have forgiven us and not forgotten the whistle call.

What’s next? While the foxes are running through the sands of the Kalahari, everyone will be sitting in front of their computer screen analyzing the data from the last two years and spreading the word on these charismatic batties. We will try not to dwell too much on what we’ve lost. Barbie

Stay tuned to see what we find…

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