Tag Archives: batty

Threesome at Pharside (A tale of 3 foxes)

Escobar

Escobar, but no Emmental

On a cold winter night, I was walking around Pharside Dam as I wanted to just check in on Escobar (one of our habituated males) in the area. After I called for about 5 minutes, he pitched up from behind a grassy patch and waited for some raisins. Happy that he was looking so good, I left Escobar around and started my search for Emmental, the other habituated male in this part of the reserve. We hadn’t seen Emmental for a while despite searching on a regular basis, so alarm bells were starting to ring. My steps took me on a big loop in the area, without much luck.

As I was walking back on the road, I spotted eyes in the distance. I took my packet of raisins out and crinkled it, hoping this pair of eyes belonged to one of “our” foxes. It was indeed a habituated fox, but not a battie! It was Ray, the Cape fox (yes, they all come with name tags)! He came running at me for some raisins. With winter on us now, foxes are all super eager for this treat! I stayed with Ray for a while when Escobar found us again.

Ray, the Cape fox, looking hopeful and apprehensive.

Ray, the Cape fox, looking hopeful and apprehensive.

I was getting rather excited and curious about how these two species will interact. Batties are slightly bigger than Cape foxes, and from the few interactions we have witnessed, they seem to be dominant. As usual, Escobar chased Ray away immediately. Definitely, these raisins were his to eat! He had to stay on his toes though, as Ray kept hanging around, hoping for a lucky raisin, and it was only Escobar’s growling and puffed-up tail that stood between him and the juicy treat.

Escie defending his stash

Escie defending his stash

But Pharside still had surprises in store for me that night, as another batty suddenly approached. To my delight it turned out to be Emmental! He was looking extremely healthy and robust compared to Escobar, so I was certain Escobar would now have to give up his stash. Escobar thought so too. He crouched down, growling, tail raised and puffed up, in a very submissive position. But within a fraction of a second, the tables were turned. Escobar jumped up and started a fierce fight with Emmental, eventually winning and chasing the bigger fox away. And for the next 30min, I was in the company of these three foxes.
When Emmental finally started to drift away, I simply could not follow him, as both Ray and Escobar were on my heels! It was a very peculiar stand off, with both of them circling me whenever I paused for a second, and Ray trying to keep his distance form Escobar. I was impressed by Ray’s tenacity.

Walking back to the car, I started wondering. How is dominance established between batties? Is the hierarchy stable or variable through time? What are the benefits of being dominant and the costs of being subordinate? Is it access to the best foraging spots? Or to more mating opportunities? These animals tend to forage together so socially – is there even a proper hierarchy? Is there any way that a Cape fox could beat up a battie? And I realized I had my work cut out for me: I need to habituate plenty more foxes during a very cold, long winter…

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Up-close and personality

It is my first field night in the Kalahari, and I feel like I am wearing every piece of clothing I brought with me. My body is nice and warm except for my fingers and toes. They are permanently encased in iceblocks. As hard as I try, ensconcing them in wool gloves and socks, they never seem to get warm. Most people don’t realize how low the temperature gets in the desert, but it is bone-chillingly cold.

The crunch of a raisin bag sounds across the sand, low shrubs, and thorns hanging at just the right height to leave a mark on your face. Suddenly, three furry faces appear and start prancing over to us. Three bat-eared fox (batty) pups have come to get their treat of sweet raisins. I am dumbfounded at how close they get to us. One little boy comes and pulls on my shoelaces. These animals are habituated!

I’ve studied a number of species as a biologist, from humongous (300 kg) sea lions to thumb-sized (6g) pocket mice, but this is my first experience working with an animal that you can walk right up to and follow without them running away. To walk with the bat-eared foxes as they meander through the tall, thorned bushes, gobbling up termites and caterpillars is a truly wonderful experience as a biologist and naturalist. Most science projects that study individuals aren’t able to do something like this; they trap individuals every so often, take the necessary measurements and samples, and then release the animal into its natural setting. If you want to study their social behavior, you do so at a distance (so you don’t upset any natural behavior) at the cost of interaction details.

My PhD on yellow-bellied marmots epitomized this approach. We trapped individuals every other week, took their weight and different morphological measurements, painted a unique symbol on them and let them go. I watched, from a great distance, as they played, fought, and ran from predators. My work focused on consistent differences in individual behavior — or personality — so it was imperative that I knew the animal I was watching and with whom they were interacting. This could be difficult at such a great distance and often the small details about their personality could be lost.

The batty project allows me to study these social little animals so close that I can examine how one individual differs from another without worrying about losing much detail. I can tell who is biting whom, who’s growling, who’s whining… This approach does call for an ongoing process of habituation, though, as new (wild) individuals keep on coming into the population. So, next up is to habituate as many foxes as possible. This is a slow, tedious process, but totally worth it.