Tag Archives: nocturnal

Psssst….That’s My Torchlight!

A bright torchlight is a must-have for a bat-eared fox field biologist. With a bright torchlight one can easily identify the owner of a suspicious pair of eyes (particularly, owners with dagger sharp horns) and avoid walking into the grasping branches of thorny acacia thickets. Most importantly, a torchlight helps when following a battie during a nocturnal follow. Information collected during follows give us an idea about batties’ diet, territory usage, and social interactions with other foxes. I can keep the spotlight on my focal fox as it dashes up the side of a sand dune or through a maze of driedoring bushes. Occasionally, a fox decides to takeoff like Superman, and it is very challenging to keep up with them when I am only allowed to follow at a “non-threatening” speed-walk. Mostly, my torch helps me to feel safe – it makes the night almost familiar to me, and is a constant reminder of how visually-centered we are, as human beings. There is no way my other senses would compensate for the absence of my torch at night.

From the beam of my torchlight I have observed foxes locate insects by integrating information from multiple senses. Like all canids, the senses of smell and hearing are wonderfully developed in bat-eared foxes. A fox will pause, sniff, and turn its head and ridiculously large ears around before dashing off to gobble up termites, pick a caterpillar out of a bush, or even dig up a mouse hole. By turning their large ears about foxes hear even better in stereo (this is called binaural hearing) and can focus on their prey items. While the foxes’ ears and nose do help them locate insects, it doesn’t quite always give them the balance I expect. For example, on a particularly nippy winter night I observed one of our foxes, Bain, digging up ant nests. He picked around a bush, sniffing and swiveling his ears about before pouncing a bush and digging it up. A couple of times he dug too deeply for ants, and then fell head-first into the deep hole he had just dug. It was impossible not to laugh!

Avoiding trouble by finding batties in daylight...

Avoiding trouble by finding batties in daylight…

During a follow a fox sometimes spends just as much time patrolling its territory as it does foraging, and possibly a fox uses smell to locate familiar places in their territory. Just as I use a torch to light up the night to make things familiar to me, fox urine is quite useful when marking over other fox pee or on termite foraging patches. Ilor, in particular, travels several kilometers during a follow. He will urinate on a random interesting spot after sniffing it, then another spot, and another, and so on. Occasionally foxes are known to wee on researchers boots or research equipment as well. This is how my field torchlight came to smell. I had set down my torch to feed Ben raisins, but Ben had other ideas. He came up to the torch, sniffed it, lifted his leg, and “pssst,” my torch now stank of battie pee. I still am not sure if I should be offended or happy that Ben claimed me as his own… I of course later sanitized my torch, but I still advise not smelling it too closely.

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